Pakistan Flag Etiquette/Protocol

Discussions on flags used in Asia and the Middle East.
APS221
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Pakistan Flag Etiquette/Protocol

Postby APS221 » 15 Apr 2012 11:38

I was online reading articles about flags when I came across this letter to the editor of Dawn, an English newspaper in Pakistan.
Link: http://dawn.com/2012/04/15/displaying-t ... rrect-way/
Date 15 April 2012

A COUNTRY’s national standard is more than an object that flutters on flag masts or rests against the façade of tall buildings — it is a country’s identity, an expression of its ideals and aspirations of its people, and a symbol of a nation’s collective pride. It, therefore, deserves the highest respect and the greatest attention to detail.

On Pakistan’s National Day, March 23, it was certainly invigorating to see so many flags atop public and private buildings and at numerous public places. Many newspapers, including Dawn, carried pictures of the national symbol. However, there were at least two pictures in your paper on the day where the flag was misrepresented.

On the front page there was a picture of a flag proudly held by young Pakistanis to celebrate the country’s victory at the Asia Cup. The feeling the picture created was truly elating.

But a close look at the flag revealed a mistake in the design of the flag. With the white vertical bar on the right, the white crescent and star should have been pointing towards the southeast.

It is unlikely that the flag had turned over, and the design got inverted. The image of the crescent and star are sharp enough to dispel the idea.

The bigger mistake was on page 2 — the picture of the flag in front of the Wapda House in Lahore. Not only is the proportion of the total flag wrong (the correct ratio being 3:2), even the space given to the white bar was not a quarter of the size of the flag.

The most disappointing part, however, was that the crescent and star on this flag as well were pointing in the wrong direction. I am sure other publications may have carried a picture of this prominent institution.

What can one say about people or organisations that cannot take enough care to ensure that our national symbol, prominently displayed by them, conforms to the design standard approved by the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan? All it takes is to match the design with the approved standard available on countless sites on the Internet.

EJAZ WASAY
Karachi

The letter was printed in the newspaper's opinion section with a picture of a Pakistan flag.
Image

I found the newspaper pages with the pictures the author was referring to (from the 23 March 2012 edition):
ImageImage

As you can see in the first image, the crescent and star are pointing to the lower fly when viewed from above. The author seems to dismiss the idea that the flag was inadvertently inverted and held upside-down. However, it looks to me like that is what happened.

In the second picture, the author is correct. The flag is all kinds of wrong. As the author mentions, the flag does not appear to be the proper 2:3 ratio, the white section on the hoist side appears closer to 1/3 of the flag instead of the proper 1/4, and the crescent and star point to the lower hoist instead of the upper fly.

Can anyone offer some insight in to Pakistan's flag protocol? Did the folks at the Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA) make a mistake or order a poorly constructed flag? Is this some special flag designed to be hung vertically with the crescent and star pointing to the flag's own upper right?

Also, while looking onling for additional information, I found a couple pictures of Pakistan flags.
The first is from an annoucement about a Pakistan National Day ceremony in Dar es Salaam: http://www.fullshangweblog.com/2012/03/ ... ay-of.html
Image
This flag has some of the same problems mentioned above. The white section along the hoist side appears to be too large (closer to 1/3 instead of 1/4), the crescent and star are pointing down to the lower fly insted of the upper fly (or the flag is upside-down), and the crescent and star appear poorly constructed.

I found this picture of a Pakistan flag in an annoucement about a Pakistan National Day ceremony in Dubai:
http://www.dubaicalendar.ae/en/event/ev ... -2012.html
Image
The difference between the flags is night and day.

APS221
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Re: Pakistan Flag Etiquette/Protocol

Postby APS221 » 18 Apr 2012 00:57

I also came across an article from The New York Times about the Pakistan flag at Rockefeller Center.

January 17, 2012, 5:20 pm
Questions Fly Over a Flag Flown Upside Down
By COREY KILGANNON
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/ ... side-down/

International incident avoided!

What were we to think here at City Room upon receiving an e-mail from a reader on Tuesday reporting something amiss among the roughly 200 international flags flown around the perimeter of the Rockefeller Center skating rink?

The Pakistani flag was being flown upside down, the tipster wrote in.

A quick online search, and a visit to the rink, confirmed the bad news. There, on the 49th Street side of the rink, in between the flags of Oman and Peru, hung the white and green colors of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. The white crescent moon was pointing down in its green field, instead of up. The star was at the bottom, not the top. The flag was upside down.

The mystery remained who did this, and why.

Flying a flag upside down can be considered a distress sign, though it can also interpreted as an act of disrespect (and has caused tensions during Pakistan’s history of rocky relations with its neighbor India).

The inversion could have been related to the political and military unrest in Pakistan. It might have been a tourist’s prank or simply a flag-tender’s blunder. After all, the roughly 200 flags of United Nations member countries are a lot to keep straight — and right side up.

In the rain on Tuesday afternoon, with soaked flags partly wrapped around their poles and hard to see, no one in the sparse crowd seemed to notice.

John LaCamp, 30, and his wife, Nicole, 28, two bankers on vacation from Eugene, Ore., were persuaded by a reporter to look up at the flag, which they conceded they would not have recognized.

“You hope that someone wasn’t being disrespectful with the flag,” Mr. LaCamp said. His wife nodded and added, “You wouldn’t want someone to take it the wrong way if it was just a mistake.”

Khaja Mohideen, 36, a software engineer who lives in Jersey City, walked by. Mr. Mohideen, an immigrant from India, said he preferred to think the inversion was “an innocent mistake” by a caretaker.

“Hundreds of flags is a lot to keep track of,” he said. “Now if I come back in a week and it’s still upside down, then you know it’s something more than a mistake.”

About 2 p.m., a Rockefeller Center guard walked over to the flag and pulled it down, shook it and hoisted it up again — still upside down.

“That’s the correct way, as far as I know,” the guard said. He pointed out the system used to make sure the flags were being flown properly: the country name written on the edge of the flag near the top grommet. Each flag pole has a lock on its ropes, mostly to deter mischief, or the random tourist who might want to lower a flag for a photograph, the guard said.

At the Pakistani Consulate, Vice Consul Yasir Butt said he had not heard about the issue, but after being shown a photo of the flag, he called and wrote to Rockefeller Center management to ask that the flag be restored to its proper position.

“It’s a dishonor of any country’s national flag to fly it incorrectly, but we have to see if this is by error or by design,” Mr. Butt said. “I’ve been there many times and I’ve seen our flag and never noticed anything wrong.”

A Rockefeller Center spokeswoman had no information about how long the flag had been inverted, but said in a statement late Tuesday afternoon: “Rockefeller Center follows the United Nations flag protocol. The matter has been corrected.”

Mr. Butt confirmed that the flag had been fixed and the issue resolved.


Here are the pictures and captions from the article:
Image
Corey Kilgannon/The New York Times
The Pakistani flag flying upside down in Rockefeller Center on Tuesday morning.

Image
Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times
The flag restored to its proper position Tuesday afternoon.

Looking at the pictures, it appears the flag in first picture isn't just upside-down. It looks like the flag has the crescent and star pointing towards the hoist side instead of the fly side.

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VoronX
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Re: Pakistan Flag Etiquette/Protocol

Postby VoronX » 18 Apr 2012 22:41

It seems to me that the flags with the crescent and star facing the hoist are likely to be "vertical display only" flags, as that would make sense heraldically. The central emblem regularly rotates to remain facing upward, and since hoist translates to the top of a vertical flag, the crescent would have to face the white bar, rather than face downward. FOTW mentions a book that says Pakistan's flag should not be flown vertically, but questions the veracity of that assertion. It seems that there are separate designs for vertical and horizontal use, since the star and crescent should always face right and up. The flag at the ice skating rink looks to be one that should be hung vertically. If that is the case, then the large flag on the building at the top of this thread is perfectly fine.

TheMapShop
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Re: Pakistan Flag Etiquette/Protocol

Postby TheMapShop » 02 Aug 2012 21:12

VoronX wrote:It seems to me that the flags with the crescent and star facing the hoist are likely to be "vertical display only" flags, as that would make sense heraldically. The central emblem regularly rotates to remain facing upward, and since hoist translates to the top of a vertical flag, the crescent would have to face the white bar, rather than face downward. FOTW mentions a book that says Pakistan's flag should not be flown vertically, but questions the veracity of that assertion. It seems that there are separate designs for vertical and horizontal use, since the star and crescent should always face right and up. The flag at the ice skating rink looks to be one that should be hung vertically. If that is the case, then the large flag on the building at the top of this thread is perfectly fine.


Its actually my understanding that Pakistan's flag is actually never supposed to be flown vertically. Proper etiquette is that the flag will always be flown horizontally...or upside down for that matter so it would seem that some of those pictures portray errors in etiquette.

APS221
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Re: Pakistan Flag Etiquette/Protocol

Postby APS221 » 15 Aug 2012 09:17

Pakistan is celebrating its Independence Day, so there are many articles about Pakistan's flag. I found an interesting article about Chinese-made flags which use a much lighter green than regular Pakistan-made flags.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/421760/paki ... of-choice/

Image

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GoldenWest
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Re: Pakistan Flag Etiquette/Protocol

Postby GoldenWest » 10 Feb 2013 12:53

I have noticed in New York they have a thing of flying flags upside down... They did that to australia's during the UN flag line up a few years back... Till I complained


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