Río de la Plata Union Jack

Need help identifying a flag? This is the place to ask.
User avatar
Sammy
Member
Posts: 257
Joined: 26 Apr 2012 20:47
Location: Londonderry. (N.I) United Kingdom

Río de la Plata Union Jack

Postby Sammy » 16 Oct 2014 16:27

I came across this post on reddit showing off British flags captured by the Spanish during The British invasions of the Río de la Plata regions of Spanish South America in 1806 and 1807, and are exhibited today as war trophies. The dimensions of the flags are all wrong, with the diagonals completely out of line.
http://k10.kn3.net/8DE2A24FB.jpg
http://k19.kn3.net/CC9A7799A.jpg
A redesign of how it must have looked:
Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom_(1806).svg.png

Does anyone know why the flag appears to be drunk?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Leonardo Piccioni
Member
Posts: 496
Joined: 11 Apr 2012 03:18
Location: São Paulo, Brazil

Re: Río de la Plata Union Jack

Postby Leonardo Piccioni » 16 Oct 2014 19:30

They were handmade, after all.

A curious note is that the Count of Buenos Aires, hero of the siege, had many war trophies from the British in his coat of arms.
Image
Visit my blogs about flags: Create/Recreate - Flags, etc. | Flag Review |Flags of U.S. States.
Visit the Vexillology Wiki, an initiative to propagate American and Canadian flag proposals.

User avatar
Sammy
Member
Posts: 257
Joined: 26 Apr 2012 20:47
Location: Londonderry. (N.I) United Kingdom

Re: Río de la Plata Union Jack

Postby Sammy » 17 Oct 2014 12:50

That's a fascinating coat of arms, while I know many symbols on coats of arms were awarded for various deeds in battles, I have never known trophies such as flags to be included before.
They were handmade, after all.

Yes it was possibly made at sea by a private sailor or soldier, probably without the specific dimensions and details. Such mistakes were not uncommon for early Union Flags in the 17 and 18th centuries:
Screen Shot 2014-06-11 at 9.37.11 PM.png

However I am a little surprised it still happened in the 19th Century. That might explain the Union Jack but I am not sure the regimental flag was made at sea, like the Union Flag?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Leonardo Piccioni
Member
Posts: 496
Joined: 11 Apr 2012 03:18
Location: São Paulo, Brazil

Re: Río de la Plata Union Jack

Postby Leonardo Piccioni » 17 Oct 2014 14:45

I located photographs of two other surviving flags. They seem "straight": http://www.taringa.net/posts/imagenes/1 ... propi.html
Visit my blogs about flags: Create/Recreate - Flags, etc. | Flag Review |Flags of U.S. States.
Visit the Vexillology Wiki, an initiative to propagate American and Canadian flag proposals.

User avatar
Sammy
Member
Posts: 257
Joined: 26 Apr 2012 20:47
Location: Londonderry. (N.I) United Kingdom

Re: Río de la Plata Union Jack

Postby Sammy » 17 Oct 2014 19:02

I did a little reading on the history of the conflict and "RMB" on the regimental flag stands for Royal Marines Battalion, so my theory is that the marines accompanying the army in the invasion needed a flag to be recognised by (as marines normally served on ships in this period) so these flags were made, probably at short notice, which could be the reason why they differ from the other British (army) flags, which were probably made in the UK by specialist flag makers.

User avatar
Sammy
Member
Posts: 257
Joined: 26 Apr 2012 20:47
Location: Londonderry. (N.I) United Kingdom

Re: Río de la Plata Union Jack

Postby Sammy » 10 Oct 2015 22:24

I found another image of a Victorian post office ensign, the diagonals on the Union canton also seem to be out of line. http://i.imgur.com/AokHQw3.jpg


Return to “Flag identification”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot] and 0 guests